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War affected children

Program Report:

Program: Le Pelican

Spring, 2011

A Mission
 
Le Pelican’s Day Care Centre and the Bakery workshop are located in one of the poorest areas of western Kabul, among the Hazara population.

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Program Report:

Program: Education for Displaced Children

Spring, 2013

 

The church has an educational mission
that goes back more than 140 years,
making the church-run schools a vital
part of the educational landscape in Syria.

A real need for education support

The government of Syria has been providing free and obligatory education in public schools until age 12. All schools, whether private or public, follow one educational system and one Arabic curriculum. Private schools provide a more qualified foreign language program, additional social activities and fewer students per classroom than public schools.

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Program Report:

Program: Spotlight

Spring, 2013

Afghanistan: Le Pelican

Zainap’s Story (name changed)
When I came to Le Pelican with my mother I did not know my age. I just knew that I was born somewhere in central Afghanistan. With no father, we needed help.

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Program Report:

Program: Shoroq wa-Amal

Spring, 2013

 

Favorite people: her family
Favorite memory: going to summer camp
Dream: to be a doctor

Rania’s Story

Rania Sadoon, age 11, is working on a news spot. Independent thinking activities at Shoroq wa-Amal have encouraged her to speak out in the form of writing—in this case, in a piece that might go public. She is interested in addressing the issue of overcrowding in the classroom.

“When a student can hear, see and talk to the teacher and discuss with others, then real learning happens,” Rania says.

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Program Report:

Program: Displaced Children

Spring, 2013

 

Favorite part of school: learning languages
Favorite food: goat meat
What he wants to be: a soccer forward

Bonané’s Story

Love Bonané is 18 and attending his first year of secondary school near his home at the Shasha internally displaced persons’ camp in North Kivu province. He, his parents and his sister (age 13) used to live in Kashukana, in the forests of the territory of Masisi, but in 2007 fighting between government forces and a rebel group forced his family to flee.

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Program Report:

Program: Healing and Hope

Spring, 2013

 

Program impact: 300 children and youth
Participants: at risk of displacement
Parents: often work away from home

Meet Yaniris

Yaniris (10) has made great progress. She came as a girl who had trouble relating to other children without fighting. What a change! She now plays and laughs with others. This makes her very happy.  Over the last while she has experienced significant physical growth. Yaniris´ mother Paola is thrilled.

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Program Report:

Program: Education Brings Hope

Spring, 2013

 

Dilsa’s dream: become a doctor
Miguel’s dream: be a soccer player
Karen’s dream: be a nurse, teacher & mother

The Garzón Velándia Family

We've lived here 10 years. I began my family life with my first partner. We had a son, Miguel. My daughter Karen is from a new relationship.

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Program Report:

Program: Le Pelican

Spring, 2013

 

Zainap’s ethnic group: Hazara
Favourite subjects: like Math, love English
Career ambition: return to teach in home village

Meet Zainap  (name changed)

When I came to Le Pelican with my mother seven years ago I did not know my age or where I came from. I just knew that I was born somewhere in central Afghanistan. With no father, we needed help.

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Program Report:

Program: Help the Afghan Children

Spring, 2013

 

Stories of Afghan children losing a close family
member are all too common. Left unattended,
many grow up to become angry and
vulnerable to extremist elements,
perpetuating the cycle of war and violence
in their country.

Ahamd Edris' Story

From the time I lost my father I became depressed and insular. I fought with other kids almost every day. Although students and teachers complained, I continued my disgraceful behavior. One day my teacher encouraged me to join a peace-building course.

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